Making Money in Multifamily Real Estate Show

171 | Copy That Represents Your Voice with Divine Bunch

February 09, 2022 Dave Morgia Season 1
Making Money in Multifamily Real Estate Show
171 | Copy That Represents Your Voice with Divine Bunch
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Divine's Background:

  • Divine owns a Website Copywriting business focused on helping real estate investors connect and gain visibility through their sites

In this episode we cover:

  •  04:11 - Divine's Investor Only Niche In Copywriting
  •  05:24 - Easy, quick fixes you can make to your website
  •  08:02 - Determine Your Target Audience
  •  14:00 - CTAs and Visitor Experience
  •  18:42 - Some Common Fixes
  •  21:35 - Unique Selling Points
  •  26:00 - 5KQ1 - If you could only pick one trait that explains your success, what is that trait and why?
  •  27:38 - 5KQ2 - What is the most uncharacteristic thing you've done in your business and why did you do it?
  •  28:16 - 5KQ3 - Can you name any time where you felt like you were not going to end up successful? How did you overcome that fear?
  •  29:54 - 5KQ4 - Can you name a time where something in your business went perfectly and what did you do to make that a reality?
  •  32:04 - 5KQ5 - What have you been focusing on lately to improve yourself or your business?

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Intro:

Welcome to the Making Money in Multifamily Show, where we discuss everything to do with multifamily real estate investing. We believe it's the best way to gain financial freedom and build lasting wealth. This is where you'll find it the best information and practices to help you succeed in your real estate business, whether you're already experienced or just starting out. Here's your host, Dave Morgia.

Dave Morgia:

Hello listener and welcome to the show. I am your host, Dave Morgia. And with me today is Divine Bunch. Divine. Welcome to the show.

Divine Bunch:

Thank you so much for having me.

Dave Morgia:

Yeah, super excited for this one Devine. And just to fill the listener in a little bit more about you. Divine is a website copywriter and designer and she is focused on helping real estate investors specifically connect and gain visibility through their websites, pretty much just making sure you have your functioning website. And it's something that an investor is going to actually want to click through and, you know, be comfortable investing with you in the future. So just to go further into Divines background, she has been investing in real estate since she was 17. And then even further than that, she has pretty much been an entrepreneurial life, she started a banana pudding business at age seven, she loaned money from her mom, and it's paid that loan back obviously, since and pretty much has had that entrepreneurial spirit since a very, very young age. So yeah, Devine, would you just mind, maybe going into that story and just catching us up to speed on where you are today?

Divine Bunch:

Absolutely. So it definitely started when I was six or seven. My mom, she has always been a business owner, her mom was a business owner. So she just really wanted to get us into the mindset of work for yourself. And even if you decide to go for a corporate job, just always be able to have your options open. So from the banana pudding business, now I learned how to network that had to have been so painful for my mother, she would just let me lead the conversations and figure out how to talk to people in a way that they cared about not so much just getting my point across. And I feel like that has been super instrumental in where I am now. Because from there, I went on to have my own ad agency and so on and so on. I I played around with corporate for a little bit, I got a job. When I was about 18. at Barnes and Noble, which I was obsessed with. I loved working there, I spent way more money than I made. It was not good. And then from there, that was when I started, I was already kind of into real estate, my dad and I read started looking into wholesaling. And the goal was for us to house hack. Well, when I turned 20, he wound up passing away of cancer. So I just kind of had to like redirect and figure out like, okay, wholesaling is not something I feel like I could do solo, not with my personality. So what are we going to do now. So I kind of took a break from real estate. And I just went on, like this little journey to figure out what I was into what I was really good at. And then I came across marketing. And I was like, this is totally my thing. Because back in high school, skipped over this, I was in a debate club. So I love doing all of the research. I loved figuring out like what counts as a qualified source. And then what's just kind of like, you know, somebody's opinion and just kind of numbers thrown together. And I loved putting together those presentations, but I hated being the one to present them. So when I discovered copywriting it was like, Oh my gosh, I get to be the one who does all the research, I get to be the one who makes everybody sound really good. But I don't have to be the one to do it. I have to present it. I love it. So that's the long tail of how I got into copywriting. So it kind of obviously it came together with real estate investing, because that was my background. And I realized that was just kind of an underserved area in the copywriting space.

Dave Morgia:

Yeah. And I guess that was kind of my first question. Because doing my homework I noticed you mentioned you know, not doing copy for brokerage or agents or anything like that, but specifically investors only. So was that born out of the sense that you were an investor and you only wanted to target investors since you kind of have that background? And, and just were with all or what was the decision there for you?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, so I'm actually open to writing for other niches, but I really want to focus on investors, because the way that I've seen it, they're the most underserved group in real estate. So a lot of people you know, get into investing and we think, Okay, we're gonna do this, we have all of our numbers and as long as things go to plan, this is going to be awesome. But if things don't go to plan, if you can't get investors in the timely manner that you know, the whole deal is supposed to go through. If you can't get tenants in your properties, then you have a failed dealing. You don't know understand why. So my goal is to really help investors understand how to get into the minds of prospective tenants, investors, brokers, people that they want to have in their networks in order to put their best foot forward and be as successful as they can be.

Dave Morgia:

So you mentioned it not going to plan. So maybe we could start there. What are some of the mistakes you see out there? Or maybe have an example or two, or just just the kind of easy things where you could kind of see the the storm coming? And if you kind of leave that on your website like that, are these types of things that you you know, you might have trouble, when you actually come time to needing to raise?

Divine Bunch:

Yes, I love this question. So something that I see often is that on their websites, people will often put the accolades that they have, the decrees they have, they'll just kind of put the property up there, and maybe a few numbers around it. But there's no storytelling, and I really don't know who's behind the deal. And what I'm going to be stepping into outside of just, you know, the technical real estate things. So I love when people put their personalities into their website so that I can make the decision of is this going to be somebody that I want to work with? Whatever you're looking to invest with someone, it can be a little bit nerve wracking, deciding, am I going to hand over this large sum of money to this person? Do I trust you? What's this deal going to be? Like? Are you? Are you more facts driven and data driven? Or are you more emotionally driven? Things like that? And then how do you use that to play to your strengths, and I love being able to tell that from someone's website. So even when I'm writing for my clients, that's something that I really focus on is including all of the facts, the data, the formatting, all the sciency things, but called making that collide with their website to be as transparent as possible.

Dave Morgia:

Yeah, I think it's probably something that a lot of people early on struggle with, it's something we've kind of grown over time with, but having that kind of personality to whether it's your website, or say, you know, your newsletter for the month, those things, it's kind of like a trust, but verify, right, like, your investors want to trust you. So they trust you by liking you, they are going to verify you by making sure the deal is good. But that's because you already earned their trust to say, Oh, I do want to do business with this person. They just got to make sure that the numbers then check out to meet their needs. So it's kind of funny, where if you're not paying attention, you could just be deal deal deal, and then they never even like you to begin with. So it doesn't really get you anywhere.

Divine Bunch:

Exactly. Yeah.

Dave Morgia:

So getting to there. What do you recommend? Is it really just kind of tearing down a lot of the what's there and making it more narrative on the website? How do you kind of move forward? I know, we're not talking about a specific example on a website or a newsletter site, but But where do you kind of begin if it's totally lopsided?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah. So before I even start writing, I spent a good week to two weeks just doing market research. So I figure out who are we trying to attract? What is their role in life? What are they doing on the day to day? What are their interests? And then we want to learn how do they take in information, so it's not so much about getting your message across, it's about getting it across in a manner that they're going to understand it. So for example, I used to hate school, because in school, you know, they teach you textbook textbook textbook. So I learned by story. So I would draw pictures when I was really little at the stories. And that's how I would remember things. And I would always get in trouble. And then I would fail. And they wonder why. So your website is really the same way. You know, a lot of times, even if you are getting those leads, if you do the things that you need to do to get your website to rank well. But you bring in traffic, and it's not in the manner that they're ready to receive the information, they're either going to leave, so you're going to have a high bounce rate with Google. And that's not going to be good, which will also hurt your SEO. But also you're not going to have the qualified leads that you need. So people are going to be looking at it, they're most likely going to either tap out or just be really confused about what you're doing. And those are things that you don't want if you're investing in your website.

Dave Morgia:

Okay, so yeah, I guess we're getting into nitty gritty Now, a couple things thrown around. And SEO is like one of the ones that like for 90% of people, it just is three letters and doesn't mean anything to them. Yeah. Can we just maybe crack down a little bit? And I didn't even know but you mentioned Bounce Rate basically affects that. And I didn't know that. So can we go into some of the things that people aren't paying attention to? And how to how to better do these things to make sure you're taking care of yourself online?

Divine Bunch:

Oh, yeah. So SEO, the easiest way to define it is it is how Google decides to organize your website and then rank your website and what to rank it for. So I'm trying to think of how to say this in a manner that's easily understandable. So things that affect SEO would be like user experience. So when I say bounce rates, I mean Google is tracking, how often are they staying on the page? Are they sharing it? Is there credible information on here? Is there false information on here? And what types of websites are linking to this website so that Google can figure out who you're catering to. And if you're catering to a quality audience, or more spammy types of websites, so it can get a little complicated, but the main thing to worry about and to focus on is making sure that your website is very clear about what you do. And using verbiage that outlines what you do, and making sure that your user experiences good. So investing in a copywriter and a web developer are two of the most important things you can do.

Dave Morgia:

So I guess, when time on the website and interacting with the website is the name of the game, you mentioned copies a big thing, obviously, that's a big hook to keep people reading. Right? What else? I mean, I guess there's that initial push just to have that interest rate to keep reading. But where else do you need to direct people when we're talking about real estate investing? Specifically? Is it to the about page? Is it to the like investment properties page? Where do you kind of find the best return on your time to keep them clicking and interested?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, that's super important. So I always like to tell people whenever you are, if you're DIY your website, whenever you are building it out, at the beginning of every page, you always want to have what you do and who you do it for. So you know, a lot of people will focus on putting that on their homepage, because they assume people are going to find my homepage, and then they're going to go here, then they're going to go here, and then they're going to go here on my website. But that's not always the case, because it could just be but even if you optimize one website to rank on Google better, one page on your website to rank on Google better, they could still be finding you from another podcast, or like a little link that they found where it's going to go to a different page. So if somebody is coming to that page, it doesn't say specifically at the top what you do, and then they kind of have to, to go through your website to figure out what to do. And not all the time, are people going to put in that effort to even find out what you do. They just might say, Oh, I don't know, I'm confused and then leave. So a really important thing to do is to have it all the way at the top. Typically, homepages do best service pages are the second highest in my experience. But that can be down to the type of person that you're working with. And then how you link to different pages on your website with other people who are linking to your site.

Dave Morgia:

So you say service page, that doesn't really ring a bell to me something that's a page on like an investor syndicators website necessarily. So that'd be like the investor invest with us page or what would be the kind of real Yeah,

Divine Bunch:

so that would be like, invest with us, or if you have different courses and things that you're doing? Or if you have investors who are coaching and things like that?

Dave Morgia:

Whatever the proposition is, basically, okay. Yeah. Yeah, it can be wide. Yeah, I'm sure. Going from basically medium material, you know, learning courses, all those things. Um, yeah. So I guess to sum it up, it's somewhat repeatable information between the homepage and the about us page, right. But you don't want obviously copy and paste. Right. So I guess just high level on home and then more detailed on the About Us where you break down teammates.

Divine Bunch:

Yeah. So the homepage, I like to do just like a short blurb about who you are. And then like, what kind of moved you to start this. And then on the About Us page, that's where I really get into the nitty gritty of your story, and then how that serves them. And it's always written in their best interest.

Dave Morgia:

Got it? So moving into, like action steps, I know, one of the things is kind of to make sure they're doing something on the website, clicking is good. I know call to actions are very popular, obviously, to get you into the kind of CRM platforms, you know, sign up for the newsletter, these things. What do you kind of play around with as far as like, effectiveness on that goes?

Divine Bunch:

Yes, so I say never have any less than three to four call to action buttons. And what's super important from the SEO standpoint would be to make sure that you are linking to other areas of your website so that people are spending more time there. But you also want to link off a little bit. So if you have things like resources that they that would be helpful for them to understand a little bit more about what he do podcasts that you've been featured in book recommendations, things like that, that helps build credibility with Google. Now as far as getting people to act in the manner that you want, you want to have one singular action that's primary about everything. So whether That's getting them on your email list in order to be able to market to potential investors. Whether that is booking a call with you to see about touring an apartment complex, however, that looks, there should always be one primary action. And that should be very obvious and a reoccurring theme throughout the same.

Dave Morgia:

Yeah, I never considered it to be one primary. I guess that makes sense. Because you should have a super high level KPI right of like, what is the result of someone visiting my website today? Yeah, yeah, for us. It's email. But yeah, we toy with? I mean, we have a call book a call with us button too. But yeah, I guess really, you should be focusing on one, which is, which is the email for us? So yeah, that's interesting. I never really thought of it that deeply though. So. So thanks for that course. Um, one thing with investing, at least with investors is once they become a lead, you have like the invest with us page where you can sign into a portal and stuff. Now, is that anything that you need to kind of worry about when you're talking about this, like optimization of getting the leads into the kind of funnel? Or is that more of a different situation and a different kind of setup on the website?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, that's something I'm still learning about. Because normally the portals, I don't really mess with those, because it's something that's already built out. And so I just write the physical website, but I'm still trying to figure out how that works with search engine will SEO? And if there's anything that I can do to optimize that better,

Dave Morgia:

yeah, to me, it seems like it's pretty, you know, private and segmented. It's really just like kind of a button on the website. But I wonder if there's something that needs to be captured there. But yeah, I have no idea myself, honestly, I just know, there's some way it could be cleaner, I'm sure someone will figure it out someday.

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, I'm still trying to figure out if there are different platforms that mess with site speed at all. Because how fast your site loads also pours in your SEO. So if there are some that have a really heavy database to them, then they might slow up your website a little bit kind of hurt your rankings. But that's, that can be subjective. So

Dave Morgia:

okay, we may we may get into some technical stuff, and I won't dive in too long, because we might lose people. But when you say, you know, loading pages and stuff, is there, is there stuff you kind of think about if you're DIY in this, whether you're talking about hosting certain places, or, or, you know, all these services, where you basically build a website out of is there anything you would kind of say watch out for when it comes to that?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, so I know WordPress can be a little slow depending on the plugins that you use. But it's still probably one of the best sites that you can use as far as SEO Squarespace is another one. But if you're DIY, if you're DIY, and you have a very specific taste, Squarespace requires a lot more coding. But it's super easy to get like a design template, or just use the little premade homepage, or the little pages that they have. Another thing as far as site speed would be, make sure that you are using a lighter analytics tracker. So things like Google Analytics, or monster insights, those are the things that tell you who's on your page, how long they spend on your page, where they're coming from thing in the source of traffic. So whether they came from Google or your social media, or someone else's website, stuff like that. There are so many things that factor in but just making sure that the plugins and the data that you're using on your website are as light as possible, but also very effective. And reliable. Yeah, I

Dave Morgia:

think, I think, um, well, we use WordPress. And like you say, it's pretty customizable. There's a lot of plugins. And I think you could probably, yeah, let it walk away from self trying all these extra plugins, and then all of a sudden, you have a website that takes 30 minutes to load and the investor, you know, hits the back button. You have to be careful there. But But yeah, super useful stuff there. If you're toying with it, or whatever, to try out. Kind of getting more back to, you know, the mistakes people make or where you've maybe stepped in to help. What are some examples of I guess, like some messy websites, where you completely had to do over was it hosting mistakes? Was it kind of the the platform? Or are you really kind of bread and butter with with the copy stuff? And just making sure the website reads? Well,

Divine Bunch:

yeah, so I try to stick with the copy to make sure that when the website reads well, I do actually have an SEO team that I work with now. So I'll let them look at it and tell me like, this needs to go or we need to revamp this section, so that the site will run faster, we need to make this area a little more interesting. So that, you know, the bounce rate isn't so high. So I definitely prioritize that because I want to make sure that people are getting their return on investment. But I really focus on the wording.

Dave Morgia:

Yeah, so you step into a website that's completely botched and we kind of mentioned earlier, but we'll revisit it kind of completely, you know, not very friendly. And you don't really know who the images are what, I'm pretty much a guy who only knows how to write technical papers. So I let my partner do the copy. He's more creative than I am. But say you were talking to me. Do you have to get to know me to a certain extent before we dig in? Or how does it kind of go when you're stepping in with a new client?

Divine Bunch:

Oh, yeah. So that there is, it is long, it's like 2025 questions that I asked. And we really get into the nitty gritty of what is your business? Like? What are your goals? Where do you see your business a year from now, because I want to make sure that the copy that we're putting on there, it's also accounting for, you know, changes that could happen in your business, I don't want to get too specific in some areas where you're going to need to constantly change it. But I still want to make sure that it's as effective as possible, and that people know as much about you as possible so that we can keep that transparency and that trust factor there. So that's what it looks like in the beginning. And then that's when I go into the market research. And I kind of tell you a little bit more about some things about your audience, you might not have known. I tell you about your your USP or your unique selling position that I think people would, that the research would show that people would really want to work with you based on things that you're doing that not everybody else is doing. So it's very exciting and a little confidence boost.

Dave Morgia:

Alright, so I got to dig into these USPS, because that sounds super interesting. So I assume you found more than a handful of, you know, just new clients and learning their kind of unique proposition there. So how does that conversation even go? Are they surprised sometimes to even hear that they have a unique spin on the business? You know, how does that normally go?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, so actually, my first client that I had in the investing space, I, we were kind of going through the website before we even touched the copy. And she was like, I really don't know what I bring it because she was newer. And so I just kind of, okay, so copywriters, we have this reputation for being starters, because we need to know who we're talking to what we're working with. So I'd gone through all of her social media, I looked up all of the things that she'd done with other people, videos and things. And I explained to her, you are just like this ray of sunshine in an area where people can be a little more stiff. And people love that about you. That's why they want to learn from you. So we definitely want to drum that side up. So we really focused on her being a people person and a cheerleader in this space. And the deals that she's gotten the endorsements that she's gotten the partnership she's gotten, I'm just, I'm so proud of her. So it's really helpful.

Dave Morgia:

That's amazing. And I think I know who it is, I love to talk on the side, but I just the way you marketed it. She's now marketing yourself that way. And I think I know exactly what we're talking about here. So it's amazing. No, I just wanted to hear that. I'm sure there's some use cases out there where you're doing your homework, you're comparing, say me to every other syndicator, real estate investor, etc, out there. And you see the deltas the differences between everybody. So you kind of can see the unique twist that everyone brings to the table. When in my mind, sometimes I similar to other people out there, and I'm sure other people feel the same way. So I'm sure it's interesting to hear those conversations from time to time. Yeah. Where Where else can we go? I don't know if there's too much. I think SEO might be a scary topic to really super dig into deep, especially because you have a team that might be able to explain it better. But um, but on the copy side of things, say someone wants to continue to DIY. And now that they listen to this episode, they've kind of looking at their website, would you recommend they just kind of start from the top and do that intro and do the intro on the about page and just redo those and start from there? What would you say are the you know, the quick actionable steps today?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah. Oh, that's a big question. You're sitting down. Right? Exactly. So I definitely prioritize market research. I feel like it cannot be nearly as effective as it should be without it. So when outlining your website, you want to know how does your market consume information? Do they lead with logic? Or do they lead with emotions, and then you're going to want to place if they're more emotion heavy, you're going to want it to be very skimmable. That's super important. You're going to want it to be very skimmable in formatting and make sure that you're plugging those emotional points where they need to be make sure that you're telling a story. If it's more if they're logic and data driven, you're going to want to lead with logic and then plug that all throughout. You're still going to want to make it skimmable but the main goal is to show where the data is in The areas that they're going to be looking the most. From there, I would say just write, make a million copies that just suck, and then make and then keep going back and refining it. Honestly, I'm a little bit different. I don't have like a template that I follow for each website, because everybody is so different. And you find different things every time. So, yeah, that's a hard question to answer, it would just really come down to who your audience is and how they learn.

Dave Morgia:

No, I think you nailed it, and probably just the state market research. I'm assuming if you DIY a website, you probably didn't do enough there. Like you said, I'm sure you 10 acts, what you even should be doing to begin with, you know, so even just 10% of what you're doing is probably a huge leap forward if you're actually take the time to do that. Yeah, so appreciate it divine. And I'd love to hit these five key questions before we run out of time today, of course. So the first one here is if you could only pick one trait that explains your success, what is that trait and why?

Divine Bunch:

It would definitely be finding my USP. So when I first got started, I was so young, and I really didn't have a good idea of who I was, or why people would even like me. And I think I really had to focus on dispelling imposter syndrome. So once I figured out why people did business with me, honestly, I was able to get a few clients and and kind of ask them like, why did you choose me over anybody else? And you know, a bunch of different questions with that. And I learned that it's because of my personality, like, I am definitely a cheerleader. I love keeping up with clients and finding out how they're doing with their goals. And that's why people came to me, and that's why they came back. Because they love that feeling of you know, having a cheerleader in their corner. So that is something that has definitely carried me. And then of course, the fact that not to brag, but I'm actually good at what I do. There's so many copywriters out there that just, they just write words, and they don't understand the science behind it. So I am constantly learning. I'm constantly finding new strategies and yeah,

Dave Morgia:

no delivering obviously Trump's All right. So that's good. Yeah. Be the nicest person. But if you don't, you know, return money to your investors or, or deliver a good website, you're probably not going to keep clients. Exactly. Awesome. And then Devine, what is the most uncharacteristic thing you have done in your business? And why did you do it?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, so that would also go back to my personality. So like I said, in the real estate space, things can be a little stiff sometimes, or people just don't really know how to grow beyond. This is the property. This is what I've done. These are my accomplishments. So something that I'm very intentional about bringing to the real estate space is lead with your story lead with your why lead with your personality. And I think that that is a huge difference that shoots my clients above their their competition.

Dave Morgia:

That's amazing. And then we'll get into Canada situations here. But can you name a time where you felt like you weren't going to end up successful? And how did you overcome that fear?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, so that would also be my personality. I really struggled with figuring out why anyone would work with me. And I really didn't think I thought, you know, there's so many great copywriters out there. So why would anybody even choose me? And from there, it really spun out into me having to do some soul searching and figure out like, what are my strengths, what makes me good at what I do, what reinforces the skills that are needed, and things like knowing I love to research and knowing that I love to sit around and write without talking to people all day. But I think by writing those types of things really helped boost my confidence. So there was a point where I had to really understand what made me strong so like in my morning routines, I had to write down affirmations about I am this thing I am that thing and it was super helpful as far as gaining roots in in my success.

Dave Morgia:

Yeah, solid morning, where are you just reaffirm yourself and what your goals are and who you're gonna be. And all those things are huge. I can't understate it enough, but we could probably do a whole episode on that.

Divine Bunch:

Exactly.

Dave Morgia:

And pretty much the flip to that one. Can you name a time where something in your business went perfectly and what did you do to make that a reality?

Divine Bunch:

Yes, so that would be just a few days ago. I So a few months ago, I started on a website with a client. And we did a few things just to try and get her site to rank better. And she was kind of already doing well on conversions, but she just wanted to rank better. And I was explaining to her, you're ranking better, you need to be getting more conversions, or else something else is wrong. So we worked on the SEO for her site, and she started to rank better. And we were both really excited about it. But she wasn't getting those conversions. And what's going on here. So we did a little bit more digging a little bit more research. And we figured out, I will I decided that we needed to reformat some things because it was very data driven. Well, it wasn't so much it was data driven. But the way that we had things formatted, the data was just kind of the focus, even though the copy was focusing on story. So we reformatted some things, we move stuff around, and it really told a story. And it was easily skimmable, it was easier for people to just find their emotional pain points, get those taken care of and then buy. So she just emailed me, because that was Monday or Tuesday. And she's like, Oh my gosh, you're not gonna believe it. My conversion rates like doubled. And I'm like, Yes. It was so awesome. So it was it was the expectation that I already knew should come. But it was just that little hiccup that was kind of scary. Why isn't this converting and then being able to go back in and fix that?

Dave Morgia:

Man, I don't do any of this copy or SEO or anything. But that's a fun little problem solving thing that shows into results. So it kind of sounds right up my alley, and you can't pick everything but sounds like something I can toy around with for a little bit just to play with. So I know that that's amazing to be able to you know, dissect it and reapply and and see the instant pop there. That's really cool. Yeah. And then the last one here to mind is what have you been focusing on lately to improve yourself or your business?

Divine Bunch:

Oh, that's my favorite thing. So I am super strict about my morning routines. If I don't do that, I'm not focused. My squirrel brain is just on 10 All the time. It's not good. So I really prioritize my morning routine. I am an avid reader always have been. So right now, I'm not really reading self help right now. Well, I'm kind of reading The Slight Edge. But I'm also reading the hands off investor because I am looking at getting a small Maltese soon. So I'm trying to re refresh my my intelligence there. And outside of that, it's really just down to my community. You know, I am in Mandy McAllister his community, aspiring women achieving more, and their accountability group is just amazing. And then where I live, also, people are so supportive here, everybody, it's it's very heavy on starting small businesses, which is great, it makes it an awesome market. There's so much job growth, but the people around here just very supportive. And you know, they're of the same mindset. So very grateful.

Dave Morgia:

Now, that's amazing. And I just wanted to thank you for your time today. It's not a show I get to do a lot. Usually more real estate focused on the shows, right talking about some investing principle. But this stuff, especially if you're tailoring to investors, and people that are going to be passively working with you super critical and probably something a lot of people overlook more than they should, especially when they're getting going. So if someone has some questions for you, or wanted to start working with you, how can they reach you to mine?

Divine Bunch:

Yeah, so I of course, there's my website, divine writing agency.com. I'm super active on my Instagram, which is just my first and last name divine bunch. And you can also reach out to me on LinkedIn which I'm starting to get more active there again, which is also defined by

Dave Morgia:

Divine. Thank you so much, once again for your time and by the way, your USP is your personality, I just had a great conversation, so really appreciate it once more. So of course

Divine Bunch:

thank you for having me.

Thank you for listening to the show. I don't take your time and attention for granted and appreciate that you would spend it with me. If you enjoyed this show or any of my previous shows, it would be a huge help if you would rate and review the show on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcasting service, or even just share the episode with a friend. And if you'd like help from me or would like to talk about real estate investing further, feel free to visit the show notes for more information, or you can visit davidtravis.com.

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Unique Selling Points
5KQ1 - If you could only pick one trait that explains your success, what is that trait and why?
5KQ2 - What is the most uncharacteristic thing you've done in your business and why did you do it?
5KQ3 - Can you name any time where you felt like you were not going to end up successful? How did you overcome that fear?
5KQ4 - Can you name a time where something in your business went perfectly and what did you do to make that a reality?
5KQ5 - What have you been focusing on lately to improve yourself or your business?